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On the Watertown Seal is a picture of an English Colonist and an Indian exchanging, as peace tokens,  bread for fish.  Captain Roger Clap landed at Nantasket Point in 1630 and rode up Charles River to Gerry's Landing with the first party of Watertown Colonists.
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Emergency Alert - Inactive
Wildlife Information
For information on local wildlife, including information on addressing nuisance wildlife conditions please visit the MassWildlife website at:

http://www.mass.gov/eea/agencies/dfg/dfw/fish-wildlife-plants/living-with-wildlife.html

Please note: No one can randomly destroy wildlife simply because it is on their property.  It is also ILLEGAL to live trap an animal and move it to release on other public or private property.  If a property owner can not resolve a wild animal issue and this animal is destroying property or threatening personal safety they may contact a  licensed Problem Animal Control Agent (PAC) to trap and humanely euthanize said animal.  The Town Animal Control Officer is not a PAC agent and may not legally handle wildlife unless it is sick or injured.

Daytime activity of animals that are most active at night, such as raccoons, skunks or coyotes, is not an indicator of disease.  If an animal is hungry it will continue to seek out a food source.   

PLEASE READ BEFORE INTERFERING WITH YOUNG WILDLIFE!
If you come across young wildlife of any species please do not touch or pick up

Most of the time these creatures are NOT orphaned. 'Baby' birds can leave their nests and be on the ground while still being cared for and while learning to fly. Rabbits will dig shallow nests for their young and cover them with grass.  These nests often times uncovered and discovered while mowing your lawn.  You will rarely see the mother rabbit, she will only return to the nest for very short periods of time to feed her young. If you find a nest in your yard please keep dogs restrained and cats indoors until the babies leave the nest.  

Human interference with young animals threatens their survival both long term and short term. 

For more detailed information from MassWildlife please click the following link:  

http://www.mass.gov/eea/agencies/dfg/dfw/fish-wildlife-plants/young-wildlife.html